KS5 English

Overview:

In Years 12 and 13, English Language and English Literature are thriving subjects that are popular with all arts, humanities and science students and AQA is our chosen examination board.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

“We open our mouths and out flow words whose ancestries we do not even know. We are walking lexicons. In a single sentence of idle chatter we preserve Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Norse; we carry a museum inside our heads, each day we commemorate people of whom we have never heard. More than that, we speak volumes – our language is the language of everything we have read. Shakespeare and the Authorised Version surface in supermarkets, on buses, chatter on radio and television. I find this miraculous. I never cease to wonder at it. That words are more durable than anything; that they blow with the wind, hibernate and reawaken, shelter parasitic on the most unlikely hosts, survive and survive and survive.” (Penelope Lively, ‘Moon Tiger’)

Year 12 English Language

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Teacher 1:

Introduction to linguistic frameworks.

Language and gender.

Teacher 2:

Original Writing coursework.

Child Language Acquisition.

Teacher 1:

Accent and dialect.

Language Change.

Paper 2 preparation.

Teacher 2:

Language and social groups.

Language Change.

Paper 1 preparation.

Teacher 1:

Language Investigation preparation.

Paper 2 preparation.

Teacher 2:

Language Investigation preparation.

Paper 1 preparation.

Year 13 English Language

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Teacher 1:

Language Investigation.

Language Change.

Teacher 2:

Textual analysis.

World Englishes, accent and dialect.

Teacher 1:

Language Change.

Paper 2 preparation.

Teacher 2:

Language and social groups.

Paper 1 preparation.

Teacher 1:

Paper 2 preparation.

 

Teacher 2:

Paper 1 preparation.

ENGLISH LITERATURE

“Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books, the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change (as the poet said), windows on the world and lighthouses erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind.”

(Barbara Tuchmann)

Year 12 English Literature

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Teacher 1:

‘Love through the Ages’: ‘The Great Gatsby’ and the AQA anthology poetry.

Teacher 2:

‘Love through the Ages’: ‘Othello’.

Teacher 1:

‘Love through the Ages’: ‘The Great Gatsby’ and the AQA anthology poetry.

Introduce central coursework text.

Teacher 2:

‘Love through the Ages’: ‘Othello’.

Unseen poetry.

Introduce comparative coursework texts.

Teachers 1 and 2:

 

Paper 1 preparation.

 

Teaching of coursework.

 

 

 

Year 13 English Literature

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Teacher 1:

‘Texts in Shared Contexts: World War 1 and its Aftermath’: ‘My Boy Jack’ and ‘The Oxford Book of War Poetry’.

Teacher 2:

‘Texts in Shared Contexts: World War 1 and its Aftermath’: ‘Regeneration’ and ‘The Oxford Book of War Poetry’.

Teacher 1:

Paper 1 preparation.

Teacher 2:

Paper 2 preparation.

Teacher 1:

Paper 1 preparation.

Teacher 2:

Paper 2 preparation.

Assessment dates:

  • Regular, whole-school assessment weeks will take place during the year, where assessments will be conducted in lessons in examination conditions. All assessment questions are based upon the question types and skills that pupils will need to master for A-level. Examples are as follows: 

English Language

  • Evaluate the idea that spoken interactions between men and women are characterised by miscommunication.
  • Evaluate the idea that the English language is changing and breaking up into many different Englishes.
  • Analyse how language is used in Text A and Text B to present views about the nature of language change. In your answer you should:

– examine any similarities and differences you find between the two texts

– explore how effectively the texts present their views.

  • Write an opinion article about language change in which you assess the ideas and issues raised in Text A and Text B and argue your own views.

English Literature

  • Explore the presentation of war in this extract. Remember to include in your answer relevant detailed analysis of the ways that the writer shapes meanings.
  • Examine the view that Barker presents issues around psychological damage as the most important theme of ‘Regeneration’.
  • ‘Typically, male characters are presented as proud, devious and murderous’. In the light of this view, discuss how Shakespeare presents Othello in this extract and elsewhere in the play.
  • Compare how the authors of two texts you have studied present love and loss.

Internal examinations:

Year 12 internal examinations will take place in the Summer Term of Year 12.

Year 13 mock examinations will take place in the Spring Term of Year 13.

  • External examinations:

English Language

14.06.17 (am) Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society (2h30m)

20.06.17 (am) Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change (2h30m)

English Literature

15.06.17 (am) Paper 1: Love through the Ages (3h)

22.06.17 (am) Paper 2A: Texts in Shared Contexts: World War 1 and its Aftermath (2h30m)

Ways I can help my son/daughter
 

1

 

Speaking and listening skills: discuss current developments in all aspects of English. Talk to students about texts they are reading or concepts they have been discussing in class e.g. Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’ and Pat Barker’s ‘Regeneration’ for English Literature, or language and gender and Child Language Acquisition for English Language (please see the Sixth Form English curriculum pages for details of set texts and modules for each A Level).

 

 

2

Reading skills: help your child to find challenging and reliable websites to aid their research. Encourage reading around the subject either on the internet or paper based media e.g.

 

Links/websites:

English Language and English Literature: Andrew Moore’s website (www.universalteacher.org.uk).

English Language resources: www.ling.lancs.ac.uk (The University of Lancaster’s linguistics site).

English Literature: www.literaryencyclopedia.com; www.sparknotes.com; www.luminarium.org (Literature from the Middle Ages to the 17th century); www.shakespearestudyguide.com; www.bitesize.com; www.literaryreview.co.uk. http://writersinspire.org/ (University of Oxford’s ‘Great Writers Inspire’ site).

 

Books and journals:

‘The English Review’ (Phillip Allan magazines): 21 years’ worth of back issues to search through. This is excellent for both English Language and English Literature courses.

Times Literary Supplement: www.the-tls.co.uk.

York Notes Advanced (study guides available for a range of literary texts).

Oxbridge recommended reading lists: http://oxbridgeenglish.co.uk/recommended-reading/

‘Think on My Words: Exploring Shakespeare’s Language’ by David Crystal.

‘The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism’ ed. Vincent B. Leitch.

‘The Norton Anthology of English Literature’ ed. Stephen Greenblatt.

‘Rediscover Grammar’ by David Crystal.

‘The English Language’ by David Crystal.

 

Memberships and affiliations:

www.poetrysociety.org.uk.

Various societies exist for different authors e.g. www.janeaustensoci.freeuk.com; www.tolkiensociety.org.uk; www.fscottfitzgeraldsociety.org.

 

 

3

Writing skills: encourage students to share their essays with you and to explain their ideas/arguments to you. Encourage proof-reading and editing of written work. In the new specifications, accuracy is now worth a far higher proportion of marks than previously.

 

 

4

 

 

 

5

Creative ideas: encourage engagement with concepts and texts through radio/television.   Visit places of significance including libraries and geographical locations.

Activities, events and lectures:

Star Lecture Series (The University of Manchester): email schoolsandcolleges@manchester.ac.uk.

Essay writing and/or creative writing competitions (offered by different examination boards, many universities and writing websites e.g. www.thepinkmist.co.uk).

TED talks (www.TED.com).

National Novel Writing Month: www.nanowrimo.org.

Theatre visits e.g. RSC in Stratford-Upon-Avon, Royal Exchange and The Lowry in Manchester.

 

Independent learning in English:

KS5 English Language and English Literature are all about independent learning! Here is the guidance we offer to our students to help them develop as learners:

  • Read around the subject! The ‘English Review’ magazine is in the ILS and contains many useful articles for both English Literature and English Language.
  • Read other texts by the same author you are studying, or research as many articles as you can if you are attempting to emulate one (for example).
  • Learn key terminology and use it in your essays.
  • Make a habit of learning relevant quotations to employ in your essays.
  • Practise analysing language and understanding how devices are used to achieve particular effects. Whenever you read something, whether it is in English lessons or not, consider how that writer is trying to address and engage his or her audience.
  • Consider the feedback from your teachers carefully; it is there to help you make progress and move up the grades, but this will only happen if you act on it.
  • Use the relevant mark schemes and familiarise yourself with the different Assessment Objectives.
  • Manage your own learning: devise a plan to manage your time; organise and prioritise assignments; meet deadlines.
  • Have good study skills: make and take notes; gather and use information; read, listen and write effectively.
  • Know how you learn best and make an appropriate choice of strategy in lessons.
  • Take responsibility for your learning when working in a group.
  • Extend your learning beyond the classroom: go beyond the obvious when completing home learning and prepare for the next lesson by re-reading notes or scanning the chapter of the novel that you read last lesson (for example).
  • Listen to what you need to do to improve and take responsibility for acting on this whenever you complete a written response
  • Develop an appreciation of reading and form regular reading habits. This applies to English Language and English Literature students. The more you read, the more knowledgeable, confident and skilled you will become!

Effective learning of English is achieved both inside and outside of the classroom environment. Throughout the year, pupils have the opportunity to experience trips to the theatre, visit the ILS and participate in literary competitions. We also like to promote creative writing and many of our pupils have experienced success (even being published as young writers!) in writing and poetry competitions. We run a Book Quiz in Years 7 and 8, a Debate Quiz in Years 9 and 10, and our links with our local primary schools have been strengthened via Year 5 and Year 6 Gifted and Talented lessons. Our KS5 Subject Ambassadors help to run our extra-curricular clubs and our Paired Reading scheme, and are role models for our younger learners. There are many ways that our pupils can extend their enjoyment of, and achievement in, English.